Saving Lancashire’s Archaeology: the Lights Flicker but Don’t Go Out

On the 31st March 2016 the Lancashire County archaeological planning  advisory service closed. As Lancashire was the first local authority to appoint a county archaeologist, way back in 1963, this is a heart-wrenching moment, which may act as signal to other lcoal authorities that they too can ditch this kind of heritage planning advisory service…   …However, Joanne Smith…

Countdown to Destruction: Closing Lancashire’s HER

Lancashire’s Archaeology is on a countdown to destruction, with the 29th January 2016 the next fateful date in a slide towards the wilful obliteration of the county’s heritage. Why? Well you could look at this petiton here: http://www.change.org/p/marcus-johnstone-save-lancashire-s-archaeology-from-cuts To explain: in November 2015 I wrote, in my capacity as Chair of CBA North West, two letters to…

Destroying Lancashire’s Archaeology

Lancashire County Council have announced (November 2015) huge cuts to their services. Amongst the many services to be closed (including five museums such as Queen Street Mill above) is a proposal to close the Lancashire Historic Environment Service. This will leave the county without any controls over archaeology threatened by development, just as happened in Liverpool between…

Archaeology in Crisis

Archaeology in England is in the middle of its worst crisis ever according to Jane Greenville of the CBA. Speaking at the CBA winter meeting in London in February 2014 she highlighted the cuts in local authority budgets which make it possible that the provision of county archaeological services, established in the 1970s and 1980s,…