Revolution: Protecting and Understanding Industrial Archaeology

Industrial archaeology remains the gawky and introverted teenager of the archaeological world – at least in the UK. In Britain it often feels like industrial archaeology (and its sibling Post-medieval Archaeology) is in equal measure misunderstood, ignored or looked-down upon by the academic world. It’s been left to voluntary societies, the profession, local authorities and…

An Archaeology of Cricket

Whilst sport has been played for thousands of years, mass sporting participation is one of the consequences of industrialisation, and like the classic industries of the Industrial revolution it has left a remarkable physical legacy, from football stadia and dog racing tracks to public parks the first of which was published on Manchester ten years…

What’s the Point of Recording 20th Century Industrial Archaeology?

Conferences are one of the ways in which archaeology refreshes itself, through presenting new work, challenging orthodoxy and making new linkages between data and colleagues. This year’s Association for Industrial Archaeology (AIA) research seminar, part of the Association’s annual conference, had the theme of ‘Archaeological Work on 20th Century Industrial Sites’. 1 All the speakers…

Understanding a Revolution: the Archaeology of Industrialsiation

The launch on the 19th April of Industrial Archaeology: A Handbook by the Council for British Archaeology at the Ironbridge Gorge & Museum Trust was one of the milestones in English Heritage’s ‘Industrial Heritage at Risk Year’.1 This 12 month project, launched in October 2011, aims to undertake research to reveal how much of our…